World War Z: Of Brad Pitt and soda ad cameos

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Image Source: msmagazine.com

Apocalyptic films are just that—apocalyptic.  Most of the time they just share the same plot: a world in chaos with a super human phenomenon—it could be a tumultuous war against a megalomaniac dictator, an invasion of a monarchy of aliens who sees the Earth as a potential colony, or any violent upheaval that makes light matter of humanity’s well-developed technologies.  But what if the antagonist is none of these, but a corny bunch of walking deads, of rancid zombies?

World War Z, an apocalyptic zombie film based on  Max Brook’s novel, begins with barely mawkish drama that could have let one imagine that the entire film would revolve around Gerry Lane’s (Brad Pitt) family and his being a former UN troubleshooter.  But this drama ends immediately, as the following frames do not hesitate to go straight to the point: as the family drives through the Philadelphia city traffic, an uproar breaks the peace, causing severe traffic flow, and giving way to the appearance of the so-called zombies.

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Image Source: thew14.com

Action-packed, intentionally rowdy, and breathtaking.  What follows is a series of zombie-killing scenes peppered with occasional dramas of Gerry choosing to save the world over his own family, as a protagonist is expected to choose the greater heroic cause.  After, the entire film continues in a not-so-otherworldly fashion: Brad Pitt travels around the world to find the weakness of the zombies—which he then finds minutes before the film ends. The open-ended finale, which shows zombie survivors from different parts of the globe, has Gerry Lane reuniting with his family.

Perhaps the film’s only fault is the profusion of a popular soda product at the climax—which killed the drama that could have merited a standing ovation for Pitt after killing all the zombies in a cinematically otherworldly fashion.

But who could not forgive a “just right” film if Brad Pitt is in it?

World War Z trailer - video
Image Source: theguardian.com

Samantha Pouls understands that as a high school student who is interested filmmaking, she must not only look at the films produced outside the States but be a supporter of her own country’s movie industry, too. This Facebook page provides updates on her other activities.